“New World in the Morning”

There were some lovely songs recorded in the 1970’s … many of which are still appropriate for today (and probably tomorrow). This was another one that I came across in my task of converting vinyl to digital! It stresses the perennial message that “tomorrow never comes” in the context that, if you really want to do some thing, you shouldn’t wait until “tomorrow”. When you think about it, if there is something we want to do that is important enough to plan starting “tomorrow”, then surely  it is important enough to start today?

I remember listening to a speaker who had spent many hours talking with individuals who were at the end of their lives.  The ones that had been productive, and could look back with smiles of satisfaction, readily accepted their demise. Conversely, those who had procrastinated throughout their lives, often by simply putting off doing things until “tomorrow”, were the ones that were  bitter. From their perspective, life had been unfair to them.

Today is really all we have, and there are no guarantees about tomorrow. One day, tomorrow really is not going to come … literally!  Use today to write that letter; send that email; make that phone call; start a walking program; be careful about what you are eating; make the first move to repair a relationship; do anything that you have been thinking about starting “tomorrow”. Nike’s logo of “Do it now” says it all. Enjoy Roger Whitaker reminding is of all this!

 

“The Shamrock and the Thistle.”

Many of you know that I have a significant library of music, covering a wide range of genres. Music has always been important to me and, while I have over 7000 tracks currently on my pc, I have a large number of vinyl albums yet to be converted to digital.

Back in the 1960’s, and on a Saturday evening, I would often be found at a local pub …. upstairs in a room used by the Peterborough  Folk Club.  The entertainment there was generally very good. English Folk Music appealed because if its simplicity (totally acoustic), and that there was often some kind of message in the song. Continue reading

“Zombie”

When I discovered Disturbed’s cover of “Sounds of Silence” (previous Post), I also discovered Bad Wolves cover of The Cranberries’ “Zombie”. I have many Cranberries songs in my library, and loved Dolores O”Riordan’s vocals. It was a sad day when she left us so prematurely in 2018, which made me question the ethics of marketing a cover version of a song (which she made so popular) so soon. I was however curious, so I did listen to it. Continue reading

“The Sound of Silence”.

I couldn’t wait until Saturday for this one!

I am guessing that many of you, when in your mid/late teens/early 20’s … heard a song which totally absorbed you to the point that you blasted it to everybody within hearing distance. It probably didn’t cross your mind that different people have different tastes in music! For me, this is one of those recordings! Continue reading

“The Lady of Shalott”

Anybody who can play a standard harp and sing at the same time is good from my perspective. When they can get (and hold) my attention singing a lengthy song in “olde English” some of which is a little baffling  to me, then they are really special.

“The Lady of Shalott” has undergone a number of changes over its considerable lifespan, but I believe Tennyson (the apparent original author) would be very happy to hear Loreena McKennitt’s take on his poem.